Pinspiration: Low Fat Wendy’s Frosty Copycat

Hey friends!

If you follow me on instagram, you may know that I’ve got several projects going.  Among those, one involves fabric:

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And another one involves sanding:

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I hope to have the delicious deets posted here soon, but in the mean time….

Jessie at Fact or Pin-tion graciously invited me to write a guest post for her blog.  Her format is to test all of those crazy life hack pins to see which ones are legit and which ones are duds – fun, right?

I decided to test a Low Fat Wendy’s Frosty Copycat Recipe.

Peep the post on her blog to see the results!

Have a great day, lovies!

Art is Everywhere

Friends, I hope you all had a wonderful Easter weekend.  If Easter isn’t your thing, I still hope your weekend rocked.  If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen that the fam and I enjoyed a decadent brunch this Sunday, including Quiche Lorraine, Honey Baked Ham, Fruit, Mimosas, loaded potatoes and my favorite thing to make, bacon wrapped cinnamon rolls!

Brunch

Because my mom is the coolest lady you’ve ever heard of, she still gives my sister and I (and even our boyfriends) Easter baskets full of treats.  It’s not like we’re in our late twenties or anything… Lies, we are.  One of my treats this year was a little 5″ x 7″ Peter Rabbit puzzle called Scarecrow.  The fella and I put it together last night while pigging out on chocolate bunnies and skittles.  I was smitten y’all.

how to preserve a puzzle to use it as art

I laid three coats of Antique Matte Mod Podge on that baby and let it dry overnight.

how to preserve a puzzle to use it as art

This particular type of Mod Podge has an ever-so-slight tan-ish tint to it, giving an antique look to whichever surface it’s applied.  The image already has that kind of look to it so I didn’t actually need to use the antique matte but it was the only Mod Podge I had on hand.

how to preserve a puzzle to use it as art

I popped my ‘podged puzzle into this pretty pearl picture frame.  (What is my deal with alliteration lately?)

how to preserve a puzzle to use it as art

The frame was one of my many clearance Target purchases – $4.94 check and yes please.

As the title of this post points out, art is everywhere.  Even in a “gag gift” (her words) your mom the Easter Bunny stuffed into your Easter basket.  I love the simple, quaint feel of the picture.  Props to Beatrix Potter for creating such sweet imagery.  I don’t have kiddos but I think it would be perfect in a nursery!

how to preserve a puzzle to use it as art

Have you ever preserved a puzzle to use as artwork?  Do tell…

Pink, Painterly and Polished

Pink, Painterly and Polished.  The three Ps.  Yes, the three Ps.  Oh, that’s not a thing?  Ok well look here, friend: If you have ten minutes, a vase and some nail polish you’re 100% qualified to take on this little DIY.

easy diy painterly vase

Look in your nail polish stash and pick a few colors that you like or that look good together, or preferably they meet both of those standards.

easy diy painterly vase

Grab that sad dollar store vase that’s been giving you buyer’s remorse (yes, even for a dollar) for months now and give it a wipe-down.  I used rubbing alcohol on a paper towel to remove all of the fingerprints and months worth light dust the vase collected.

easy diy painterly vase

Start with your lightest nail color and throw some random swipes on your vase.  Let dry for a minute or so.

easy diy painterly vase

Move on to the second lightest color…

easy diy painterly vase

And so on…

easy diy painterly vase

Ending with the darkest color you chose.

easy diy painterly vase

Let it fully dry for about an hour in a cool-ish area of your house and then fill that beauty with water and your favorite flowers!  Peachy carnations are one of my preferred picks and they perfectly complimented the pinks in my polishes.  Whoa how many Ps was that?

easy diy painterly vase

Has anyone else given a face-lift to a boring dollar store vase?  Or maybe you like to alliterate as much as me?  Do tell…

Eats: Rahr Texas Red Mac N Cheese

Yeah I cook too.  I know I normally post about home projects here, but another thing I do at home (a lot) is eat.  I recently got a wild hair to make scratch beer mac n cheese and holy beer boil, Batman.  It was good.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Before I get to the nitty-gritty I need to address something.  I am a lover of craft beer, local beer, trying new beers, drinking my favorite beers….  If you’ve never tried a Rahr beer, obtain some by any means necessary.  This, like all of my other posts thus far, is NOT sponsored by Rahr or anyone else.  I just happen to be a huge fan.  They’re local to my area – Fort Worth to be exact – and I’ve never tried a single Rahr I didn’t like.  Not once.  Their brewery tours are ridiculous.  Three beers and a tour around fancy machinery?  Yes, I’ll have that pleasethanks.  Lets get to it, shall we?

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups dry pasta – I used Farfalle (aka bow-tie pasta) which is my fave pasta shape
  • 8 oz white cheddar
  • 4 oz gruyere
  • 4 strips cooked bacon, crumbled (I used 8… more on that later)
  • 1 or 2 green onion stalks (?) chopped
  • 1/2 stick of butter
  • Rahr Texas Red Beer (you’ll use one and a half bottles in the recipe, but I recommend drinking some too – after you’re done cooking of course)
  • 1-2 tsp flour
  • Garlic Powder
  • White Pepper

Supplies:

  • A pan to cook your bacon (unless you’re using bacon bits – I’m not judging)
  • 2 pots (one for noodle cookin’ and one for cheese meltin’)
  • A glass bowl (you’re gonna want to make a double boiler to melt your cheese)
  • A whisk, spoons, colander, cheese grater and other standard cooking tools

Prep Steps:

  • Cook and crumble bacon or open your package of bacon bits
  • Shred your cheeses
  • Cube or shred your butter

 

A google search told me that amber lagers pair well with white cheddar (I drink my Rahr with any food), so after a tasting where the fella and I ate a chunk of cheese and then sipped on two of our favorites, we both decided that Texas Red was the winner.  Buffalo Butt was a close second, though.  Time for happy cooking.

The first thing you want to do is cook your noodles.  In beer.  I poured one beer and 12 oz of water (just fill your empty bottle) into my pot.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

When beer boils, it does crazy things.  Keep your heat around 7 or 8 on your stove to avoid this:

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

When the beer comes to a boil, toss in your noodles.  They seemed to take a tad bit longer to cook than when you just cook them normally.  If I were bathing in beer, I’d probably hang around longer too.  Whenever the noodles are done to your liking, drain them and set them aside.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Meanwhile, make your double boiler.  Fill your other pot with water – enough to get good coverage under your bowl but not so much that it will spill over when its boiling.  Set your bowl on top of the pot and set your heat to around 8.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Put your butter (half of a stick, remember) in the double boiler and let it melt down.  It goes faster if its in chunks or grated.  While its melting, pour in half of a bottle of Texas Red.  Drink the other half if you please but do it responsibly folks.  Just because I drink while I cook doesn’t mean its safe.  Do as I say not as… You get the idea.  I don’t have pictures of that part so here’s a Texas Red. :)

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Your water under your glass bowl should be boiling at this point and hopefully your beer and butter mixture is decently hot.  This is when you add in your cheese, bit by bit.  Give it a good whip with the ol’ whisk after each oz or so that you add.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

I also opted to add about a half tsp of garlic powder and a tsp of white pepper.  I like the taste of white pepper better than black, but really you can use whatever spices you’d like at this point.  I don’t recommend adding salt to this recipe.  The white cheddar and gruyere are rich and salty on their own.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Once your cheese is liquefied (that part takes a bit of patience), you may want to add a tsp or two of flour to thicken the sauce.  I added only one, because I like my mac and cheese just slightly on the soupy side.

Then, my friend, put your beer noodles in your bowl of beer cheese and toss to coat.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

Put your beer mac n cheese in a bowl, top it with bacon crumbles and green onion, pop open a Texas Red, chow down and drink up.  Oh and remember how I said I used 8 strips of bacon?  Don’t do that.  That’s too much bacon for this dish.  I hate myself for saying that, because really there’s never too much bacon, but it’s the truth.

rahr texas red beer mac and cheese

A food photog, I am not, but it tasted 1000 times better than this picture looks.  It’s definitely really rich, and more of a hearty winter food than spring, but it was fun to make and damn delicious.

So friends, what is your nearest, dearest craft beer?  What about a dish that calls for your favorite frosty?  Do tell…

A First Date With Chalk Paint

I’ve seen almost exactly 257 pins and blog posts about different chalk paints and the various projects that folks do with them.  Last Sunday morning I decided I wanted in on the chalk paint game.  This is how that went…

diy chalk paint stool makeover

If you remember (and thanks if you do), I bought a little sample of chalk paint during my visit to Fort Worth Vintage Market Days.  The brand is Oh Lola! Vintage Paint and the color I got was “Antique Egg Blue”.  I really wanted “Marseille”, a delightfully buttery yellow, but Yadi (the owner) said she sold out of that early.  I wasn’t surprised.  That yellow was hot.

Fort Worth Vintage Market Days

Anyway, when I bought the sample, I was already pretty much set on using it to update this pathetic little stool I had sitting around.

chalk paint stool makeover

You know the one.  Most of us have had or even still have one of these.  That sad little $10 blonde stool sold by that one huge retailer.  I actually got mine from the same warehouse sale where I bought my file cabinet that I painted.  It was maybe two bucks or something.  It seemed to have a checkered past, judging by the nicks and paint spills.

chalk paint stool makeover

Chalk paint was the perfect match for this stool.  If you didn’t already know, you don’t need to prep your surface when using chalk paint.  No sanding, no priming.  Just a wipe down to remove dust and dirt.  Also known as a lazy Sunday project dream.

So I broke out my tiny Blue Hawk brush and got to work.

chalk paint stool makeover

The first coat provided awesome coverage.  It was thick but not gloppy, and a tiny bit went a LONG way.

chalk paint stool makeover chalk paint stool makeover

I went ahead and did a second coat (after an hour long nap) since there were still bits of blonde wood poking through.

chalk paint stool makeover

This next part was a random idea that popped into my head after my nap.  I let the second coat dry for a couple of hours and then broke out my hot glue gun and a ball of polished hemp rope.  I marked the middle of the seat, glued the rope down and started working in a spiral from the center, gluing as I went.

chalk paint stool makeover chalk paint stool makeover

Always be careful with your glue gun, kids.  I’m currently sporting a less than sexy blister on my wrist.  Sometimes my arms get flail-y.

The final step was to pad the feet of the stool.  I was going to use some felt from my craft stash, but since I was already in the rope-spiraling mood, I went ahead and made cute little spiraled hemp foot pads.  I really did that part just for me, unless you want to come over and turn my stool upside down and take a look.  In that case, I did it for us.

chalk paint stool makeover

The stool ended up being a little more “farmhouse” than I expected, which isn’t really my style, but I kind of like it’s simplicity.

chalk paint stool makeover

I’m still not sure whether it has a permanent spot in my home, but I did enjoy making it!  The chalk paint was a lot of fun to use, and I’m excited to have another go at it.  I’ve got more than half of my 8oz sample left (I only needed about 3oz for this project) and I’m sure I’ll find a good use for it.

If you decide to try this yourself, you’ll need less than one ball of polished hemp rope (you can get it pretty much anywhere – even the dreaded W), a glue gun and about 20 glue sticks, chalk paint, a paintbrush and a smidge and half of patience.  Definitely doable for the novice and experienced DIYer alike!

What do you guys think about chalk paint?  Love it, hate it?  Do tell…