Tag Archives: sewing

How to Sew a Pillow Cover

There are all kinds of tutorials available in multiple media on how to sew pillow covers.  I know I’m not re-inventing the wheel here but if this tutorial helps just one person I’ll be satisfied.  This is how I sew pillow covers.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

Alternate title for this post:  That time I made a west elm knock off.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

As I mentioned in my post about my fancy-pants new headboard, I ended up having enough leftover material to make a toss pillow.  And I just so happened to have an INNER 16″ x 26″ insert from IKEA that was desperate to be opened and swaddled in canvas.  What, too dramatic?

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

Recently I pinned this pillow from my beloved west elm with the caption “Probably pretty easy to diy this one!”…  I was right.

First off, when you make a pillow cover for an insert (not just plain stuffing), always measure your pillow seam to seam.  This pillow was not 16″ x 26″ as advertised, but actually 15″ x 25″.  I would have been super disappointed if I made my pillow cover based on incorrect measurements!

The type of cover I make is generally referred to as an envelope pillow sham or envelope closure.  This method calls for zero zippers, which means I don’t have to switch out feet on my sewing machine, which makes for a fast, easy process and a happy Jamie.  Basically, the back folds onto itself like an envelope.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

The fabric for your front piece should be 1″ longer and wider than your pillow, so I went with 16″ x 26″ (remember my pillow was smaller than advertised – silly IKEA).

The back is made of two pieces, and one overlaps the other.  For this to work, they each need to be 1″ wider than your width (again 16″ in my case) half of the length of your front piece plus five inches.  Let me explain as it relates to my pillow.  My pillow was 25″ long and 15″ wide so my front piece was 26″ and 16″ wide.  26″ long divided in half is 13″.  Plus five inches is 18″.  So each of my back pieces were each 16″ wide and 18″ long.

Here’s a not at all to scale rendering of what I’m trying to say.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

To hem the edges that make up the envelope fold, I use my tried and true method of using a hem ruler to measure a 1″ fold, iron, and fold it within itself to result in a 1/2″ fold.  Then one quick stitch down the center of each fold.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

 

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

For my front, to recreate the look of this pillow, I used my Valspar Perfect Storm paint sample (also used on my headboard and some wall art) and a small watercolor brush.  I used a ruler for the middle row of dots to line everything up but after that I just free handed 16 rows on either side of the middle row.  It didn’t take long at all to dry, maybe 10 minutes after the last row was dotted, it was dried.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

So I laid the back pieces on the front piece, right sides in, with my hems in the center, one overlapping the other.  I don’t think you’re allowed to put that many commas in a sentence but it just happened.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

I sewed all the way around my fabric pieces, the stitch 3/4″ from the edge of the fabric.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

Then I flipped the pillow cover right-sides out, stuffed my insert in there and it was done.

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

Cute, right?

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

easy diy envelope pillow cover / west elm inspired pillow

Please ‘scuse the bad lighting in the above pics…

Do you prefer envelope closures or zipper closures on your pillows?  Or do you prefer to buy pillows and not think twice about it?  Do tell…

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A Curtain Of Sorts

I recently completed a pretty big project that I’m totally obsessed with.  I’m gonna give it to ya in two posts though, so you’re not stuck reading a one thousand word diy essay, k?  Lets talk about how to sew curtains.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

Supplies:

  • Blue Hawk 9′ x 6′ canvas drop cloth
  • Iron / ironing board
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread
  • Fabric scissors
  • Yardstick
  • Binder clips
  • Seam ruler (not necessary but certainly helpful)

I wanted this curtain to be floor-to-ceiling, and my ceilings are 8′ high, so the first step was to trim this guy down.  I also wanted it to be just under 4′ wide.  So I measured 4′ feet from the long side at both the top and bottom edges, folded it over and clipped it in place using binder clips.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

I then ironed a line down the length of the curtain and used that as my guide to cut the fabric as straight as possible.

I repeated the process across the width by making a fold, clipping with binder clips, ironing and cutting across my ironed line.  I went with 8′ 1″ so that once it was hemmed it would be down to 8′.

For the side hem, I used a seam ruler to iron a 1″ fold along the length of the canvas.  I then folded it within itself, resulting in a 1/2″ fold.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

Then the side got a double stitch hem all the way down.  I used a needle and thread in my sewing machine specifically designed for heavy weight fabric.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

The hem along the width would serve as the top of my curtain.  I prefer hidden tab-top curtains.  I just like the way they look.  The process to make them is a bit more tedious but the juice is worth the squeeze if you ask me.

For my tabs, I cut nine 2″ x 4″ rectangles out of my canvas scraps.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

I folded the long edges into the center and ironed.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

And then used a zig zag stitch down the middle for added sturdiness.  This left me with nine 1″ wide, 4″ long strips.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

Using the same folding and ironing technique as I used on the long side of the curtain, I prepared the top to be hemmed, but before I double stitched it, I tucked each of my 1″ wide tabs under the fold, about 4 1/2″ inches apart.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

Then the tabs got double stitched into the top hem.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

I folded the bottoms over and stitched them in about an inch and a half below the top hem so that I could slide a dowel rod through like so.

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

 

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

how to sew hidden tab top curtains

And voila!  I turned a $10 canvas drop cloth into a curtain of sorts.  I’ve used this method on several different fabrics for curtains for friends of mine and it works like a charm every time.

Stay tuned to find out how I used this curtain!  Hint: it’s not over a window.

Do you like to sew your own curtains or do you prefer to buy them?  Do tell…